IO2S Deely – “Ens Intentionale” and “Ens ut Verum”: Traveling with John Deely Beyond Non-Being

On 14 May 2022 at 2pm ET (check event times around the world here), Dr. Matthew Minerd will present on “Ens Intentionale and Ens ut Verum: Traveling with John Deely Beyond Non-Being”. A Ruthenian Catholic, husband, and father, Dr. Minerd is a professor of philosophy and moral theology at Ss. Cyril and Methodius Byzantine Catholic Seminary in Pittsburgh, PA. His academic work has appeared in the journals Nova et Vetera, The American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, Saint Anselm Journal, Lex Naturalis, Downside Review, The Review of Metaphysics, and Maritain Studies, as well in volumes published by the American Maritain Association through the Catholic University of America Press. He has served as author, translator, and/or editor for volumes published by The Catholic University of America Press, Emmaus Academic, Cluny Media, and Ascension Press.

This presentation consists in a pre-recorded lecture streamed at the above time.

2022 International Open Seminar on Semiotics (IO2S) | Website

This collaborative international open scientific initiative and celebration is jointly organized by the Institute for Philosophical Studies of the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the University of Coimbra, the Lyceum Institute, the Deely Project, Saint Vincent College, the Iranian Society for Phenomenology at the Iranian Political Science Association, the International Association for Semiotics of Space and Time, the Institute for Scientific Information on Social Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Semiotic Society of America, the American Maritain Association, the International Association for Semiotic Studies, the International Society for Biosemiotic Studies and the Mansarda Acesa with the support of the FCT – Foundation for Science and Technology, I.P., of the Ministry of Science, Technology and Higher Education of the Government of Portugal under the UID/FIL/00010/2020 project.

IO2S Deely – Umberto Eco and the Semiotic Quest for Truth

On Saturday 14 May 2022, at 11am ET (check event times around the world here), Anna Maria Lorusso will present on “Umberto Eco and the Semiotic Quest for Truth”. After Dr. Lorusso graduated in Philosophy with a dissertation in Semiotics, in Bologna, she completed her doctoral research in Semiotics, under the supervision of Umberto Eco. Following a research scholarship, Lorusso became a researcher at the University of Bologna, where she is now Associate Professor, as well as Director of both the First Cycle Degree in Communication Sciences in the Department of the Arts and the Master in Printed and Digital Publishing. Her interests have always revolved around the rhetorical-discursive dimension of culture: forms of collective narrative, dominant rhetorical figures, discursive modalities for stability, and translation and transformation of stereotypes and commonplaces. Recently she has published under many labels of excellence, including Bakhtiniana: Revista de Estudos do Discurso, Estudos Semióticos, International Journal for the Semiotics of Law, Rivista di Estetica, and Semiotica. At the present date, she is a member of the research group Trame, dealing with memory and cultural trauma, and the President of the Italian Association for Semiotic Studies.

Comment will be provided by Bujar Hoxha, PhD., full professor of Communication Sciences at the South-East European University in Tetovo and Skopje, North Macedonia.

Join the Zoom Meeting to participate in the Q&A

2022 International Open Seminar on Semiotics (IO2S) | Website

This collaborative international open scientific initiative and celebration is jointly organized by the Institute for Philosophical Studies of the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the University of Coimbra, the Lyceum Institute, the Deely Project, Saint Vincent College, the Iranian Society for Phenomenology at the Iranian Political Science Association, the International Association for Semiotics of Space and Time, the Institute for Scientific Information on Social Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Semiotic Society of America, the American Maritain Association, the International Association for Semiotic Studies, the International Society for Biosemiotic Studies and the Mansarda Acesa with the support of the FCT – Foundation for Science and Technology, I.P., of the Ministry of Science, Technology and Higher Education of the Government of Portugal under the UID/FIL/00010/2020 project.

[2022 Summer] Seven Interfaces of Philosophy

Traditional philosophical disciplines crystallized over time into a list that goes something like this: logic, cosmology, phil. anthropology, metaphysics, ethics, political philosophy and aesthetics—and, in the modern age, the hybrid and rather imperialistic enquiry known as epistemology.  Still, additional attention was demanded by issues lying both between or beyond these well-defined areas.  Thus was generated a long list of “philosophies of…” (for instance: science, religion, history, art, mind, language, education, culture, law, social science, technology, etc.).  Until quite recently, philosophy claimed a purview that had, at the very least, something to say about literally everything.  However, as the 19th century gave way to the 20th and then the 21st, some suspected Lady Philosophy may have stretched herself so thin as to no longer be about anything at all.

Many analytic philosophers maintained that there was no terrain left for philosophy as such, and that she had better learn to just arbitrate among the real sciences as technical specialists in conceptual and argumentative clarification.  Others still tried to show how one domain of old philosophy (logic, ethics, or philosophy of language, for instance) could gain purchase on the whole of the enterprise, turning over all else to the new specialists.

But philosophers have always had something meaningful to say about “the world,” although they have also needed to mark off their cognitive claims as not, on the one hand, replacing (or overlooking) what poetry and the arts, and even mythology, might have to say, as well as, on the other, what today’s physicists, astronomers, chemists and geologists teach from their university chairs.  And today they have a brand new task.  They must show themselves adroit at identifying what happened when the world turned modern, and be able to point out the causes and consequences of this unprecedented shift.  

As we survey the horizons of these human activities and questions which the philosopher inevitably faces, but cannot by rights command, we can roughly enumerate seven such domains: 1) the so-called humanities (especially history, human geography, language and literature), 2) the world of “production” (not only the fine arts, but also the servile and liberal arts), 3) the physical sciences, 4) the life sciences, 5) the new and still disputed social sciences, 6) the world of religion and theology, and 7) the very “problem of modernity.”

A person who has nothing “synoptic” and coherent to say about such matters—but without necessarily claiming expertise in any of them—is still only half a philosopher.  The wise, Aquinas reminds us, are the ones who judge all things.  They do this, however, not necessarily as specialists, but as those whose cognitive patience and contemplative leisure favor a posture of open enquiry, allowing the mind to slowly spot principles, which, in turn give birth to insights.  Within the light of this gradually embracing intellectual gaze, all the multiple and oft recalcitrant things in the world—both around us and within us—finally begin to share in an epiphany that slowly discloses how they all “hang together.”

The present seminar will begin with a metaphilosophical discussion of how philosophy has defined itself historically, and then how it can and should define itself today.  This will be followed by discussion of its obligatory interface with each of the seven problematics mentioned above. Peirce’s, and especially Deely’s, understanding of philosophy as “cenoscopic science” will serve as a useful key in bringing clarity to these relations, as will their new understanding of semiosis.  After all, one way we can sum up the synoptic scope of philosophical insight would be simply to acknowledge: everything is significant.

DISCUSSIONS:
June 4—30 July
Saturdays, 10:00-11:00am ET /
2:00-3:00pm UTC

WHERE:
Lyceum Institute digital platform run on Microsoft Teams

In this seminar, lasting 8 weeks (with a break at the halfway point—see here for more information on all Lyceum Institute seminars), we will learn what philosophy is in relation to the other human pursuits of knowledge as a cenoscopic science. The instructor for this seminar is Fr. Scott Randall Paine, PhD, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Brasilia and Faculty Fellow of the Lyceum Institute. You can read more about Prof. Dr. Paine here.

Lyceum Institute seminar costs are structured on a principle of financial subsidiarity. There are three payment levels, priced according to likely levels of income. If you wish to take a seminar but cannot afford the suggested rate, it is acceptable to sign up at a less-expensive level. The idea is: pay what you can. Those who can pay more, should, so that those who cannot pay as much, need not. Lyceum Institute members receive a further discount (see here for details).

[2022Su-A] Seven Interfaces of Philosophy – Participant

Recommended for those who are currently students or with part-time employment.

$80.00

[2022Su-A] Seven Interfaces of Philosophy – Patron

Recommended for those in professions that do not pay as well as they ought and for whom continued education is especially important (including professors and clergy).

$135.00

[2022Su-A] Seven Interfaces of Philosophy – Benefactor

Recommended for those with fulltime employment in well-paying professions and sufficient resources to provide a little more.

$200.00

IO2S Deely – Albert the Great’s Cenoscopic Understanding of Reality

On 7 May 2022 at 11am ET (check event times around the world here) Mercedes Rubio will present on “Albert the Great’s Cenoscopic Understanding of Reality”. Prof. Rubio is a Research Associate at the University of Navarra (Spain). She recently joined the Leonardo Polo Institute of Philosophy in Chicago (USA), besides being a member of the International Association for Semiotic Studies and the Societé Internationale pour l’Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale (SIEPM).

She graduated in Humanities (Philosophy Department) from the University of Navarra and wrote her MA Thesis on The Knowledge of God according to Albert the Great, which was later published in the Series Cuadernos de Anuario Filosófico. She obtained the Diplome Européen d’Études Médiévales (Brussels SIEPM – Rome La Sapienza) and holds a PhD degree from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her publications cover a wide range of topics in Greek, Latin and Hebrew Philosophy, with particular attention to the fields of theory of knowledge, philosophy of language and semiotics. Her Doctoral dissertation, Aquinas and Maimonides on the Possibility of the Knowledge of God, won the Shlomo Pines Prize (2002) and was later published in the Series “Amsterdam Studies in Jewish Thought.” She has published other studies on Aristotle, Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, St. Augustine, Averroes, and Abraham Bar Hiyya. Among her contributions to the study of semiotics, cf. “Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas on the Nature of Signs,” in „Homo – Natura – Mundus: Human Beings and Their Relationships“. Proceedings of the XIV International Congress of the Société Internationale pour l’Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale. Ed. R. Hofmeister Pich, A. C. Storck, A. S. Culleton (Brepols: Turnhout 2020) 477-488.

Commentary will be provided by Gyula Klima, Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University, New York and renowned author and editor of innumerable publications in Medieval philosophy.

Join the Zoom Meeting to participate in the Live Q&A.

2022 International Open Seminar on Semiotics (IO2S) | Website

This collaborative international open scientific initiative and celebration is jointly organized by the Institute for Philosophical Studies of the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the University of Coimbra, the Lyceum Institute, the Deely Project, Saint Vincent College, the Iranian Society for Phenomenology at the Iranian Political Science Association, the International Association for Semiotics of Space and Time, the Institute for Scientific Information on Social Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Semiotic Society of America, the American Maritain Association, the International Association for Semiotic Studies, the International Society for Biosemiotic Studies and the Mansarda Acesa with the support of the FCT – Foundation for Science and Technology, I.P., of the Ministry of Science, Technology and Higher Education of the Government of Portugal under the UID/FIL/00010/2020 project.

IO2S Deely – Peirce on History, Science, and Realism

On 5 February 2022 at 12pm ET/5pm UTC (check event times around the world here), Tullio Viola will present, “Peirce on History, Science, and Realism”. Viola is an assistant professor in Philosophy of art and culture at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. He has a doctorate in philosophy from the Humboldt University in Berlin, and before joining Maastricht University he held post-doc positions in Berlin and Erfurt. He has published mainly on Peirce, north-American pragmatism, and its links to European philosophy. His book, Peirce on the Uses of History, has come out with De Gruyter in 2020.

2022 International Open Seminar on Semiotics (IO2S) | Website

This collaborative international open scientific initiative and celebration is jointly organized by the Institute for Philosophical Studies of the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the University of Coimbra, the Lyceum Institute, the Deely Project, Saint Vincent College, the Iranian Society for Phenomenology at the Iranian Political Science Association, the International Association for Semiotics of Space and Time, the Institute for Scientific Information on Social Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Semiotic Society of America, the American Maritain Association, the International Association for Semiotic Studies, the International Society for Biosemiotic Studies and the Mansarda Acesa with the support of the FCT – Foundation for Science and Technology, I.P., of the Ministry of Science, Technology and Higher Education of the Government of Portugal under the UID/FIL/00010/2020 project.

This Week [7/11-7/17]

Weekly Schedule of Events

7/12 Monday

  • Exercitium Linguae Latinae (2:00-2:30pm ET). Legemus ex Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata ut melioremus nostrum locutionem et augeamus familiaritatem vocabulis.
  • Semiotics: An Introduction (6:00-6:45pm ET).  The second discussion of the week for the Semiotics seminar–though provisionally mentioned throughout heretofore, a close examination of the nature of triadic relations now shows itself as necessary for progressing deeper into an understanding of Peirce’s semiotics as revealed in some of his personal correspondence with Lady Victoria Welby and William James

7/13 Tuesday

  • Ex Sancto Thoma Legimus (9:30-10:00am ET).  Legemus ex Sancto Thoma et convertit in linguam Anglicam; practicum bonum et utile est!
  • Philosophical Happy Hour (5:30-7:00pm ET). Join us for drinks, conversation, lively debates, and get to know the Lyceum Institute and its members!  Open to the public: use the “Send Us a Message” form here (write “Happy Hour” in the message box) and we’ll see you on Teams!

7/14 Wednesday

  • Exercitium Linguae Latinae (2:00-2:30pm ET). Legemus ex Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata ut melioremus nostrum locutionem et augeamus familiaritatem vocabulis.

7/15 Thursday

  • Ex Sancto Thoma Legimus (9:30-10:00am ET).  Legemus ex Sancto Thoma et convertit in linguam Anglicam; practicum bonum et utile est!
  • Elementary Latin (6:00-7:00pm ET).  Beginning our new introductory Latin Class, starting from c.1 of Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata.  If you are interested in learning Latin, you can participate for just $10.50 per month!

7/16 Friday

  • Open Chat (9:30-10:15am ET). Our regular Friday-morning open chat, allowing conversation between those in the West and those in the East–bridging the international community of the Lyceum Institute.
  • Exercitium in Lingua Latina (11pm-12am ET).  Etiam exercitium in Lingua Latina!  Ista hora conveniens Orientalibus est (11am Manila time).

7/17 Saturday

  • Intermediate Latin Class (10-11am ET).  Quomodo sit Quintus?  Puer aegrotatus, dum frater eius strepitum facit; et Quintus cum Syra loquitur.  Legemus et convertemus (in linguam Anglicam) capitulum XXIV ex Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata.
  • Seminar Discussion Sessions: Week 6 of 8.
    • ​​​​​​​Science: Aristotle’s Organon (1-2pm ET).  We progress further this week, after making good progress the week previous, into the conditions and nature of science, this week attending to the varied degrees which Aristotle describes in a plurality of chapters from book I of the Posterior Analytics.
    • Semiotics: An Introduction (3-4pm ET).  How do signs shape our thinking?  In what manner does the vehicle affect the interpretant, and how does the interpretant regard the object?  How are we to classify the signs we use?  These are open-ended questions, to which Peirce gives us guidance but no final resolutions.
    • Thomistic Psychology: World and Passions (5-6pm ET).  Fear–what is it and what are its effects?  Today, I believe, our experience of fear is more diffuse, less sharp, but far more damning than in centuries past: for it causes us not to hide from things truly fearsome, indeed, but rather from the love whereby we would be ennobled in our humanity.

This Week [7/4-7/10]

Weekly Schedule of Events

7/5 Monday

  • Exercitium Linguae Latinae (2:00-2:30pm ET). Legemus ex Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata ut melioremus nostrum locutionem et augeamus familiaritatem vocabulis.
  • Semiotics: An Introduction (6:00-6:45pm ET).  The second discussion of the week for the Semiotics seminar–discussing C.S. Peirce’s “What Is a Sign?” and “Of Reasoning in General”, wherein we see the application of his categories to his semiotics in a consideration of the procession of thought.

7/6 Tuesday

  • Ex Sancto Thoma Legimus (9:00-10:00am ET).  Legemus ex Sancto Thoma et convertit in linguam Anglicam; practicum bonum et utile est!
  • Philosophical Happy Hour (5:30-7:00pm ET). Join us for drinks, conversation, lively debates, and get to know the Lyceum Institute and its members!  Open to the public: use the “Send Us a Message” form here (write “Happy Hour” in the message box) and we’ll see you on Teams!

7/7 Wednesday

  • Exercitium Linguae Latinae (2:00-2:30pm ET). Legemus ex Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata ut melioremus nostrum locutionem et augeamus familiaritatem vocabulis.

7/8 Thursday

  • Ex Sancto Thoma Legimus (9:00-10:00am ET).  Legemus ex Sancto Thoma et convertit in linguam Anglicam; practicum bonum et utile est!

7/9 Friday

  • Open Chat (9:30-10:15am ET). Our regular Friday-morning open chat, allowing conversation between those in the West and those in the East–bridging the international community of the Lyceum Institute.
  • Colloquium Q&A (6:30-7:30pm ET).  Our own Dr. Michel Accad, MD, answers our questions concerning his lecture and articles on Wholes and Parts: A Thomistic Refutation of Brain Death.  You can learn more about the colloquium here.
  • Exercitium in Lingua Latina (11pm-12am ET).  Etiam exercitium in Lingua Latina!  Ista hora conveniens Orientalibus est (11am Manila time).

7/10 Saturday

  • Latin Class(10-11am ET).  Heu!  Marcus, discipulus improbus, esse vanidicus patefaciet.  Et Iulius argutiolam exercebit!  Legemus et convertemus (in linguam Anglicam) capitulum XXIII ex Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata.
  • Seminar Discussion Sessions: Already halfway through!  Where does the time go?
    • ​​​​​​​Science: Aristotle’s Organon (1-2pm ET).  Taking over for the second half of the seminar, Professor Boyer will undertake to show for us the necessary conditions of science (ἐπιστήμη) by leading the participants through a close reading of Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics, I.1-4.
    • Semiotics: An Introduction (3-4pm ET).  Though provisionally mentioned throughout heretofore, a close examination of the nature of triadic relations now shows itself as necessary for progressing deeper into an understanding of Peirce’s semiotics as revealed in some of his personal correspondence with Lady Victoria Welby and William James.
    • Thomistic Psychology: World and Passions (5-6pm ET).  We continue this week with a consideration of the passion of sorrow, turning our attention from its causes and effects to a consideration of its remedy: how do we, in this world today, overcome not only the sorrows of lost particular goods, but the sorrow underlying our culturally-enmeshed lives?

Wholes and Parts: A Thomistic Refutation of Brain Death

In the first Lyceum Institute Colloquium of 2021, we present our own Michel Accad, MD, who will take us through a discussion of “brain death” as a supposed criterion for determining the presence of life in a human being. This colloquium lecture is based upon and expository of a paper Dr. Accad published in 2015, available here, and which you are all encouraged to read. There is also a response by Jason Eberl, PhD, and a further rejoinder to said response by Dr. Accad.

ORIGINAL PAPER ABSTRACT: I propose a refutation of the two major arguments that support the concept of “brain death” as an ontological equivalent to death of the human organism. I begin with a critique of the notion that a body part, such as the brain, could act as “integrator” of a whole body. I then proceed with a rebuttal of the argument that destruction of a body part essential for rational operations—such as the brain—necessarily entails that the remaining whole is indisposed to accrue a rational soul. Next, I point to the equivocal use of the terms “alive” or “living” as being at the root of conceptual errors about brain death. I appeal to the Thomistic definition of life and to the hylomorphic concept of “virtual presence” to clarify this confusion. Finally, I show how the Thomistic definition of life supports the traditional criterion for the determination of death.

Lay summary: By the mid-1960s, medical technology became available that could keep “alive” the bodies of patients who had sustained complete and irreversible brain injury. The concept of “brain death” emerged to describe such states. Physicians, philosophers, and ethicists then proposed that the state of brain death is equivalent to the state of death traditionally identified by the absence of spontaneous pulse and respiration. This article challenges the major philosophical arguments that have been advanced to draw this equivalence.

Dr. Accad’s lecture is now available to all members at the Lyceum Institute. The live question and answer session will be held on 9 July 2021 (Friday) at 6:30pm ET/3:30pm PT. Colloquia lectures are released the year after publication at the Lyceum, and Q&A sessions are reserved for members. For information on signing up for the Lyceum, see here.

This Week [6/27-7/3]

6/29 Tuesday

  • Ex Sancto Thoma Legimus (9:30-10:00am ET).  Legemus ex Sancto Thoma et convertit in linguam Anglicam; practicum bonum et utile est!
  • Philosophical Happy Hour (5:30-7:00pm ET). Join us for drinks, conversation, lively debates, and get to know the Lyceum Institute and its members!  Open to the public: use the “Send Us a Message” form here (write “Happy Hour” in the message box) and we’ll see you on Teams!

6/30 Wednesday

  • Exercitium Linguae Latinae (2:00-2:30pm ET). Legemus ex Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata ut melioremus nostrum locutionem et augeamus familiaritatem vocabulis.

7/1 Thursday

  • Ex Sancto Thoma Legimus (9:30-10:00am ET).  Legemus ex Sancto Thoma et convertit in linguam Anglicam; practicum bonum et utile est!

7/2 Friday

  • Open Chat (9:30-10:15am ET). Our regular Friday-morning open chat, allowing conversation between those in the West and those in the East–bridging the international community of the Lyceum Institute.
  • Exercitium in Lingua Latina (11pm-12am ET).  Etiam exercitium in Lingua Latina!  Ista hora conveniens Orientalibus est (11am Manila time).

7/3 Saturday

  • No Latin class due to July 4th Holiday.
  • Seminar Discussion Sessions.
    • ​​​​​​​Science: Aristotle’s Organon (1pm-2pm ET).  This week will focus our attention upon the acts of division and subsequent organization by looking at Aristotle’s work in On the Parts of Animals and On the Soul.
    • Semiotics: An Introduction (3pm-4pm ET).  What is thinking?  Yes–this was the topic for last week.  But it is the topic for this week too!  Looking at a few more works of Charles Peirce, we’ll pick up the propaedeutic from last week and deepen our understanding of what thinking is.
    • Thomistic Psychology: World and Passions (5pm-6pm ET).  Time for mourning and weeping in the valley of tears: this week we are on to pain and sorrow, and to see from Aquinas’ essential analysis in what ways we suffer such today.

This Week [6/6-6/12]

SEMINARS START THIS SATURDAY!

6/7 Monday

  • Exercitium Linguae Latinae (2:00-2:30pm ET). Legemus ex Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata ut melioremus nostrum locutionem et augeamus familiaritatem vocabulis.

6/8 Tuesday

  • Ex Sancto Thoma Legimus (10:00-10:30am ET).  Legemus ex Sancto Thoma et convertit in linguam Anglicam; practicum bonum et utile est!
  • Philosophical Happy Hour (5:30-7:00pm ET). Join us for drinks, conversation, lively debates, and get to know the Lyceum Institute and its members!  Open to the public: use the “Send Us a Message” form here (write “Happy Hour” in the message box) and we’ll see you on Teams!

6/9 Wednesday

  • Exercitium Linguae Latinae (2:00-2:30pm ET). Legemus ex Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata ut melioremus nostrum locutionem et augeamus familiaritatem vocabulis.

6/10 Thursday

  • Ex Sancto Thoma Legimus (10:00-10:30am ET).  Legemus ex Sancto Thoma et convertit in linguam Anglicam; practicum bonum et utile est!

6/11 Friday

  • Open Chat (9:30-10:15am ET). Our regular Friday-morning open chat, allowing conversation between those in the West and those in the East–bridging the international community of the Lyceum Institute.
  • Exercitium in Lingua Latina (11pm-12am ET).  Etiam exercitium in Lingua Latina!  Ista hora conveniens Orientalibus est (11am Manila time).

6/12 Saturday